April 13, 2022

Science is one step closer to being able to grow human blood stem cells in the lab, which would greatly aid patients with blood cancers or sickle cell disease.

Researchers in UCLA Life Sciences have led a team of that has mapped the development of blood stem cells in the human embryo. These findings, published in Nature, pave the way to grow fully functional blood stem cells in the lab.

The three first co-authors of this publication are UCLA scientists Vincenzo Calvanese, Sandra Capellera-Garcia and Feiyang Ma – all affiliated with the department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, and members of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA. The senior author is Dr. Hanna Mikkola, UCLA professor in our department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology–and also a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA

Other co-authors in UCLA Life Sciences include: Iman Fares, Sophia Ekstrand, Júlia Aguadé-Gorgorió, Anastasia Vavilina, Diane Lefaudeux, Brian Nadel, Yanling Wang, and Matteo Pellegrini.

Click here, to read the full article about this exciting discovery in today’s UCLA Newsroom.